Category Archives: History

Ancestry DNA Confirmation and Other New Discoveries in My Follansbee Family History

Well, it has been a little while since I have been on here. Lots of research into the family tree to add. I have focused on my Nelson/Ostberg branch for the last six months or so, as well as other lines (Moodey, Sweet, and others).  This year, I plan to continue the “Report to the Follansbee Association” and I need to update some earlier posts with newly found information, and other problems with dates and what-not.

Other happenings: I did the Ancestry DNA, which did verify what I already knew. However, I was surprised with the percentage of English heritage near 50%. with a total 100% European.breakdown

My current interest has been Scandinavia. With a distant cousin in Norway, I have really enjoyed a tremendous amount of information, pictures, family stories, and new family connections. The best part, being that I do not read Norwegian, is all the directly translated information. Jan, has many hours in research for our shared connections (Ostberg) as well as my direct connections (unshared) through my Norwegian  Great-Great Grandfather, my Nelson line. I share some minor DNA with Finland via my Great Grandmother Lauha Saari and Great Grandfather Viktor Lusti. My 15% Irish is via my immigrant great grandmother Ellen Manning.

ancestry

Recently, I joined a local lodge for the Sons of Norway. I love the idea of learning about my ancestors culture, learning how to cook some national dishes, and make some new connections. I plan to add some more surname pages to share some of these fantastic family histories.

My most recent and fantastic discovery is in my Moody line.  If the tree is actually accurate back to Edmund Moodye c.1500’s, then I have an ancestor that saved King Henry VIII from drowning (you can see the scene in Tudors) and was granted money and a coat of arms. How likely is it that we are actually related? I am skeptical for now, I only found the connection and story by following hints on Ancestry.com. I doubt I will take the effort and time to paper chase this, I have enough to paper verify with my early generations. But, it is a fun story.

 

 

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Bruce Follansbee 1931 – 1981

    Bruce Edward Follansbee born May 13th, 1931 was the only child of Howard Barney Follansbee (1902-1947) and Martha (Sweet) Follansbee (1906-1946). He comes from a long line of Follansbees beginning with our Immigration from England, circa 1640’s. Migrating across the continent where his Grandfather and Father would settle in Zillah. Edward P Follansbee (1854-1948) would become the Treasurer for the city council and Howard (son of Edward) would be a partner in the Follansbee and Co General Store.

     Bruce was orphaned early in life around the age of 15 according to his parents recorded dates of his parent’s deaths in the WA state archives. He lost his mother in 1946 to a brain tumor and his father in 1948 to kidney failure; just as the Nation was recovering from the Great Depression of the 1930’s. Loss at such a young age would always color Bruce’s life.

    He spent a little time with each of his Grandmothers, Lena Sweet and Edna Follansbee before he started working at the Yakima Ice Rink, where he met his soon to be Wife, Joan Nelson (1931-2008). Joan and her sister Jean performed in a group at that ice rink and were known to be pretty good skaters. From this chance meeting on the cold ice, Bruce and Joan would start a family at the ages of 17 years old. A year later his first child, a daughter was born. It was a rough start, when Bruce’ first son was born Bruce had to give up his motorcycle as three could fit and not four!! Bruce had a bike accident in the Zillah orchard and took care of baby Sharon while he was in a body cast. She would be followed by two brothers. Having three children to support, Bruce would work various jobs, mostly as a driver. For Safeway he drove a truck to transport lettuce and he worked for Belkin Moving Company. Eventually he would work and rise in the ranks for Prudential Insurance.

    As his grandson, who lost him at a young age, Bruce seemed to me to be both at once a hard, tough man who was loved and greatly respected by his family and the Yakima Community. Perhaps over the years his toughness softened, or perhaps he only had a hard shell and a heart of gold. He loved a good joke and had a fabulous sense of humor. Bruce was never one to rest on his laurels and let life move on without him. He took up running in his 40’s where he would run in the cold, in the heat, and kept pressing no matter how many blisters his blisters got. My father tells me he liked to run the roads between the old Yakima Mall and the YMCA on Yakima Ave.

    Grandpa was not without his antics as our family stories prove. From his daughter, we are reminded of her early memories. “I remember being woken in the night a few times to go camping. Bruce and friends decided after a few beers that the families should jump in the cars and head to Rimrock Lake.” My father tells stories of a tough upbringing and a strict father, but he clarifies these as due to his stubbornness (The Famous Follansbee Stubbornness) and it was during the 50’s and 60’s a tough crossroad en a generation that remembered the Depression and were toughened up by WWII and the generation of Car Hops, a Musical Revolution, and an Age that benefited from the sacrifices of previous few generations. Bruce was fiercely loyal to his family and friends. He loved his boat “Joan Louise” and had to sell it when he got esophageal cancer age 49. He died age 50 after a very difficult year. Mt St Helens blew when he had the first surgery and a year later he was gone. But he is never forgotten. In memory of Bruce, feel free to share any stories you would like to add here to this mini biography.

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Report to the Follansbee Association: The Pedigrees Pt. 1

The next few posts will be transcripts of the pedigrees listed at the end of “The Report…”

From “…Follansbee Association” PDF pp. 41-53

“Pedigree of the American Follansbees, furnished by the Follansbee descendants of New Hampshire, as gleaned from letters sent me by various members of the family”

I. Thomas Follansbee, who came from England to the Colony of Massachusetts previous to 1677, with his wife Abigail and children,

1. Thomas, b 1674-5.

2. William,

3. Abigail, 4. Sarah, who died in Newburyport, Nov. 6, 1683, they afterwards had other

children born in Newburyport, Mass., as appears by the records there, viz ;

5. Francis, b October. 1677;

6. Hannah, b April 10. 1683.

1. Thomas, son of Thomas named above m. Abigail. He died June 10, 1755, and

buried in West Newbury. His wife died in Oct. —, aged 74 years. They had issue, viz:

III. 1. Mary, b March 28, 1697.

2. William, b 3 March 14, 1700-1, married first Mary Robinson. He is described in the

Newburyport records as the son of Thomas Follansbee, Jr, from. England. He had issue

by his wife Mary, viz:

IV. 1. Moses Follansbee. b Dec. 15, 1721, at Newburyport, d in Enfield, N. H., June 14,

1812.

III.     2. William m. for his second wife ____________, and for his third wife,

Hannah Simmons, by whom he had issue, viz:

IV. 1. Thomas, b. March, 1736. d. April, 1818, at Ware, N. H.

2. Simon, b in Haverill. Mass., 1738, m Martha Huse, of Hampstead. He died May, 1821, and his wife died May, 1818, aged 83. They had issue viz:

V. Nathan, b. in Plaistow, Aug. 16, 1763, m. Anna Sawyer, of Haverhill,

    Mass: Dec. 17, 1783. He died in Enfield, N. H., Dec. 26, 1847. Anna, his wife, died Aug. 30, 1854, aged 93 1/2 years. They had issue eight children, viz:

VI     1. Leonard, b in Canaan, N. H., Dec. 7, 1784, m Love Machmore, of Newburyport, July 5, 1S05. He was a sea captain, and died at New Orleans, while doing     business at that port, Sept. 1839, and his wife. Love, died 1863.

2. James, bin Canaan, Sept. 9, 1788, m Eliza Currier, of Enfield, June 9, 181G. He died in Enfield, 1849, leaving issue.

3. Nathan, b in Canaan, N. H, Sept. 27, 1789, m Catharine Montry, of Newburyport, Oct. 24, 1809. She died March, 1841, aged 56. They had issue.

4. Martha, b in Hampstead, June 30, 179

5. Betsey, b ” ” June 10, 1795, m Abial Goodrich, of Enfield, March 15, 1814. He died Jan. 2, 1857, and she died Sept. 6, 1864, leaving issue.

6. Sarah, b in Enfield, Aug. 27, 1797, m Geo. Harris, of Canaan, Feb. 26. 1822.

7. Anne, b in Enfield, N. H, January, 1839, m Samuel Thomas, of Plainfield, N. H., August 31, 1839, now living in Burnett, Wis., with issue,

8. Lucy, b Nov. 8, 1804, m Capt. S. Whitmore, May 29, 1831. She died -March 16, 1850, leaving issue.

VI.     4. Martha, above named, m. Hubbard Harris of Canaan, March 6, 1820, by whom she had the following issue, viz:

VII.     1. Hubbard D., b in Plainfield N. H., Jan. I6. 1821, m Louisa Dearing, of Boston. Mass. Nov. 30. 1845. She was born in Portsmouth N.H. April 10, 1823. They     have one son, Hubbard D., b in Boston, Mass., Aug. 23, 1816.

VII.     2. Martha J. S. Harris b in Warren, N.H. Feb. 4, 1822, m Rev. Isaac Hobart, at Enfield, May 11, 1840. She died March 5, 1850, leaving one daughter and a son,     viz:

VIII.     1. Alfredor. b in Radnor, PA, Feb. 8, 1842.

2. Adoniram Judson, b in Radnor, Pa. April 7. 1844.

IV.     Moses Follansbee, son of Wm. Named above, m. Priscilla Heath, June 14th. 1750, and had issue,

V.     1. Moses; 2. John; 3. William; 4. Joseph; 5. Samuel; 6. Rachel; 7. Anna; 8. Betsy;

    9. Abigail; 10. Sarah; 11. Susan; 12 Martha, and 13. Rhoda.

1. Moses m. _______ and had issue, viz:

VI.     Warren; Anna. b. 1785. m. Timothy Higgins, 1861; Sally, b. in Vt., 1787, m. Ansel Fish, 1810, d. 1864 ; Polly m. Hugh Canada; Susan m. Geo. Whitney;     Prescilly, b. 1800, m. Walter Belknap, Sept. 24, 1818, and Sally who m. Ambrose Kibbee.

VI.     Dolly Follansbee. b. July 4th. 1781, in Newbury Port, Mass., m., Feb. 14th. 1700, Ambrose Kibbee, who was born in Summers, Conn., May 25th 1770 and died     in East Randolph, Vt., Nov. 22, 1827. She died Dec. 17th. 1823. They had the following issue, viz;

VII.     1. Dolly, b April 2d, 1800, d Sept. 3d, 1821, Sp in East Randolph.

2. Ambrose, b Jan. 3d, 1802. now living: in Royalton, Vt.

3. Anna, b Nov. 27th, 1803, m, 1st, Lewis Debbie; 2d, R. Gay, and d leaving; issue by both husbands.

4. Leonard, b Sept. 11th, 1805. now living: in E. Randolph,

5. P. Chandler, b Oct. 23d, 1807, living in Wisconsin.

6. Moses C, b Aug, 17th, 1809, d in Troy, and left issue.

7. Shubel C. b July 1st, 1811, a bachelor in Randolph.

8. Benjamin P. b July 28th. 1813, lives in Detroit. Mich.

9. Nathaniel, b Nov. 3d, 1815, d in E. Randolph, Nov. 5th, 1815.

10. Harvey, b Nov. 20Eh. 1816. d in Michigan. Sp,

11. Henry C., b Oct, 22d, 1818. lives in Detroit. Mich.

12. Jerred, b Nov. I4th. 1820, lives in Michigan.

13. Dolly, b Feb. I3th 1823, m Phineas D. Pierce, and now lives in Royalton, Vt.

V.     Rachel Follansbee. b. Oct. 10, 1756, m Abial Goodrich (who Was born June 3d, 1750.) at Haverhill, Mass. They had issue viz;

VI.     1. William, b Oct. 25, 1770;

    2. Ezekiel, d;

3. Follansbee, dead;

4. Nathaniel, living;

5. Eliphalet, living;

6. Abial, living;

7. Jeremiah, living;

8 Joseph. b. Sept. 7th, 1792; living:

9. Joshua, living;

10. Sally, m Wm. Welch, living; and

11. Betsey, living, unmarried.

1. Wm. Goodrich, above named, m. June 3d. 1800, Betsy Jones of Canaan, N. H. He Died Feb., 1859, and his wife died March 13th, 1845. They had issue, viz:

VII.     1. Pollv, b June 6th 1802;

     2. Betsey, b June 26th, 1805;

3. Sally, b June 5th, 1809;

4. Rachel, b. June 2d, 1812;

5. Follansbee, b June 25, 1814;

6. Eunice, b. April 7, 1819;

7. Abram, b Oct. 1, 1822.

1. Polly, above named, m. in Brookfield, Vt., Clark Wilson, of Williamstown, Vt., Dec. 17th. 1820. Clark Wilson died August 9th, 1841, and his wife Polly, May 11, 1851. They had issue, viz:

VIII.     1. Abigail G., b Au 5th, 1831.

2. Henry L., b May 19th, 1841

.

VII.     2. Betsey C. Goodrich, m. first in Williamstown, Vt., June 27, 1832, James Wolcott. He died in Iowa, in 1852, and she m. second David Martin, May 12, 1859. She had by her first husband issue, viz :

VIII. 1. Mabel, b Nov. 4, 1838, m. Ira J. Badger.

2. Boxanna, m. ____ ___ Sept. 16th, 1860, Ira C. Taylor, of Waitsfield, Vt.

VII.     3. Sally Goodrich, m. Nov, 6th, 1838. Elijah Edson, of Williamstown, Vt. She died July 25, 1859. They had issue, viz:

VIII. 1. Charles W. Edson, b. April 24th, 1841, m Aug. 21, 1864, Esther Stone, of Brookfield, Vt.

2. Lynas b Feb. 9th, 1848.

3. Ann, b March 19th, 1850.

VII. 4. Rachel Goodrich, m. Dec. 22, l826, Charles Boatwell and had issue.

VIII.     1. Mariah, b Oct. 27th, 1837, m. Andrew B. Blood, of Lewell, Mass., Nov., 1859.

2. Wesley, b Aug, 1. 1844.

3. William, b July 1.5, 1848.

4. Emma, b July 15, 1850.

5. Sarah J., b May 23, 1853.

VIII. 5. Follansbee Goodrich m. April l9th, 1849, Bethiah Harrington, and had issue, viz:

VIII.     1. Mariah, b Sept. 2Gth, 1850.

2. Esther J., b April 22, 1852.

3. Albert, b June 1854.

4. Burnet, b Nov. 8th. 1857.

5. Alma, b Nov. 21, 1861.

VII.     7. Abram Goodrich m Harriet Cass, April 26, 1854, and had issue

VIII.     Joseph C, b April 7th, 1862.

VI.     2. Ezekiel Goodrich, b in Newbury, Mass., March 4th, 1778, m Rhoda Ferrin (who was born in Ware, N. H., Feb. 28, 1780,) Nov. 25th 1802. He died in Chelsea, Vt., Aug. 13, 1841. He had issue by his wife Rhoda, born in Chelsea viz:

VII.     1. Pollv, b Aug. 9th, l805.

2. Sophia, b Aug. 10, 1808.

3. Susan, b Feb. 23, 1812.

4. Horace, b Oct. 7th, 1814.

    1. Polly Goodrich, last above named, married in Chelsea, Vt., Seth G. Durkee, of Williamstown, Vt., Sept. 23, 1824, and had issue, viz :

VIII.     Azro Durkee, b. in Williamstown, Vt, Sept. 21, 1825, and Leonora, b Nov. 5th, 1828.

    Azro Durkee, m. Maria S. Robinson, of Stowe, Sept. 14th, 1854, and had issue, viz.

IX.     1. Ella M. Durkee, b in Hydepark, Feb. 8th, 1856. Hattie P. Durkee, b in Stowe, Nov. 21, 1860. Leonora Durkee, above named, m Geo, S. Wheeler, of Randolph,     June 23d, 1853, and had issue, viz,

IX. Mary E. Wheeler, b in Brookfield, Aug. 1st, 1854. Henry P., b March 11th, 1856.

VIII.     2. Sophia Goodrich, m Luther “W. Bigelow, of Brookfield, April 2d, 1829, and had issue, viz:

IX.     1. Lester G. Bigelow, b Jan. 17th, 1831.

    2. Wilber F. Bigelow, b Jan. 5th, 1834.

    3. Lewis F., b June 14, 1830.

    1. Lester G. Bigelow m Sila Day, of Coventry, Vt., Jan. 1st, 1854, and have children, viz,

X.     Harry, b Sept. 22d, 1855.

    Fred, b Feb. 8th, 1857.

    Ida, b Oct., 1861.

    Girty S., b July 6, 1864.

IX.     2. Wilber F. Bigelow m Georgie S. Langley, Oct. 13th, 1861.

     8. Lewis F. Bigelow m Lizzie Kittredge, of Walden, Vt., May 28rd, 1861, and have issue

X.     Clarence A. Bigelow b Jan. 6th, 1862.

VIII.     3. Susan Goodrich m Eleazer Quinby, of Chelsea, Sept. 18th, 1834, and had issue, viz,

IX.     Albert E. Quinby, b June 18, 1841, and Ann Quinby. b. July 13th, 1844, m Asa J.     Kittredge, of Walden, June 13, 1863.

VII.     4. Horace Goodrich m Ann White of Sharon, Jan. 10th, 1836, and had issue.

VIII.     1. Pluma A. Goodrich, b Oct. 2Sth, 1839.

    2. Harley ” b March 19th, 1843, and married Mary F. Alicott, August, 1862, in Charlestown, Mass., and had a daughter.

IX. Ella A. Goodrich, b April 14th, 1863.

VIII.     1. Pluma A. Goodrich m Silas B. Woodbury, of Manchester, N. H., and had a son.

IX.     Fred G. Woodbury, b August 16th, 1863.

VI.     5. Eliphalet Goodrich, b in Newbury, Mass, March 6th, 1783, m Judeth Kimball, who was born in Hopkinton, N. H., April 28th, 1793. She died in Chelsea,     Vt., Feb; 7th, 1848,     and he     died in Chelsea, July 25th, 1856. They had the following children, viz:

VII.     1. Melinda Goodrich, b .March 5th, 1815, d Sept. 11th, 1819.

    2. Denison Goodrich, b Feb. 23d, 3 819, d Oct, 20th, 182-*.

    3. Nancy J. Goodrich, b Sept. I5th, 1823, m Kev. A. I. Copeland, and had issue, viz:

VIII.     Mary J. Copeland, b in Montpelier, September, 1850.

    Osmon B. Copeland, b in Waitsfield, February, 18.54.

    Carrie ” ” b in Bradford, January, 1856.

VII.     4. Judith K. Goodrich, b November 18th, 1825.

    5. Maria Goodrich, b March 14th 1829, m Matthew H. Kimball, September, 1855, and had issue, viz:

VIII. George Kimball, b in Hopkinton, N. H., March, 1858.

VII.     5. Marenda F. Goodrich, b in Chelsea, October 17th, 1835, m Elliot P. Densmore, May 2nd, 1854.

VI.     8. Joseph Goodrich, b 1792, m Sarah Glidden, November 17th, 1817, and had issue.

VII.     1. Richard K., b January 20th, 1818.

    2. Rachel, b May 1st, 18l9.

    3. Jane H, b December 21st, 1820.

    4. Abial, b December 28th, 1822.

    5. Alpheus, b July 23d, 1824.

    6. Mahala S., b March 16th, 1826.

    7. Malinda, b September 29th, 1829.

    8. J. B., b June 18th, 1831.

    9. Darwin, b March 20tb, 1834.

    10. Warren, b March 19th, 1839.

    12. George, b April 10th, 1841.

    1. Richard K. Goodrich m Olive Smalley, February 14th, 1842, and had issue, viz:

VIII.     1 Fanny, b November 21st, 1843.

    2 Abbie, b February 11th, 1846, and m Goin B. Evins, October 21st, 1864.

VII.     2 Rachel m Albert Hixon, February l9thth, 1843, and had issue.

VIII.     1 Matilda F. Hixon, b February 19th, 1849, m Lewis Hovey, February 2nd, 1865.

    2 Charles A. Hixon, b May 25th, I860.

VII.    1 Jane H. m Noah Downs, January 2d 1842, and had issue, viz:

VIII.    1 Henry, b January 25, 1845.

    2 Adna B., b. Nov. 21st, 1847.

    3 Laura Ann, b March 21st, 1862.

VII.     4 Abial Goodrich m Elmina Waldo, and had issue, viz :

VIII.     Nellee, b 1856.

VII.     5 Alpheus m Luna C Sprague, December 2nd, 1832, he died December 6th, 1858, leaving issue,:

VIII.     Ellee S., b April 17th, 1856.

VII.     6 Mahala S. m Harley D. White, August 4th, 1851, and had issue, viz:

VIII.     Marcelus, b August, 1853.

    Sarah, b January, 1855.

    Clarence, b July, 1859.

VII.     7 Malinda, b 1829, m Wm. A. Robins, July 5th, 1854, and had issue,

VIII.     Hattie J., b March 10th, 1859.

VII.     8 J.B. Goodrich m Doborah J. Osgood, April 3d, 1856, and had issue,

VIII.     Hattie, b March 28th, 1857.

    Lucy, b November, 1858.

    Sarah b August, 1859.

    John, b February, 1862.

VII. 9 Darwin m Julia Jeffords, July, 1861.

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Filed under Durkee, Edson, Follansbee Association, Goodrich, History, Kibbee, Lineage, Wilson

Report to The Follansbee Association. Part I

Report to the Follansbee Association U.S.A.

By Columbus Smith A.D. 1865

Summary

               The Report is a mix of fact and fiction. The pedigree for my family line checks out perfect, but the listed coat of arms (a bee hive) and some timing in the sale of the 3 equal parcels of Follonsby Farm does not match historical record. One thing that is only mentioned in this report, and by that as word of mouth, that the Follansbee line in England starts with a Knight in the service of W.m. the Conqueror. While this makes for a great family story, the evidence does not bare this out. Available for anyone to view are historical records from Durham Cathedral that Follansbee Village was previously marsh and forest land that was drawn up to 702 acres and sold to Thorold de London around the 12th century by the Bishop of Durham. There is about a 90 year gap between William the Conq. and Thorold’s purchase.

Referring back to the coat of arms listed in the Report, A hive of Bees for Following bees does not match the history of the name. My prevailing theories on the name come from the original name Folete, Foletebi. If you have read the posts below, you may recall that Thorold’s son Nicolas is the first “de Foletebi” after he inherited the village from his father he was recorded as Nicolas de Foletebi. So, what we seem to have in the Report is a valid set of pedigrees, some scant information on the Follansbee Farms (former Village) in Durham Eng. and some filler information by our investigator.

The first section of the Report is titled “Organization” which comes in two parts, the preamble and the constitution. The preamble begins with its purpose and states a desire for further investigation in England. The Follansbees of America wanted to find and cash in on what they think to be a million dollar estate left in England.

ORGANIZATION

         A general meeting of the Follansbee Family was holden in North Enfield, N. H. on the 8th day of May, 1865, in order to collect information relative to the Follansbee property in England, and to devise means to have a thorough investigation made of their claim to a very largo estate situated in England, said to belong to the Follansbee Family in America. It was thought that no longer delay should be allowed in this matter, but there should now be joint action and the question should be finally settled as to whom the property really belongs, and that steps should at once be taken to recover this immense estate if practicable. The Follansbee Family at this meeting was well represented, and the following Constitution was unanimously adopted:

THE FOLLANSBEE ASSOCIATION.

 PREAMBLE.

Whereas, It is believed that there is in England, real and personal property to the amount of one million dollars or more, said to belong to the Follansbee family in America; and, whereas, the next of kin and heirs to this property are said to be in America; now, in order to prosecute that investigation and procure the pedigree of the family in this country, so as to connect them with the deceased who left the Estate, we, the undersigned, do agree to form ourselves into an Association under the following:

CONSTITUTION.

 Art. 1. This Society shall be called the Follansbee Association,

Art. 2. C. M. Fisher, (.f London, England, and Columbus Smith, of Salisbury, Vt., are hereby appointed agents for the purpose of investigating the case in America and England, and are requested to make printed reports, from time to time, of their doings to the members of the Association.

Art. 3. C. G. White, of Middlebury, Vt., is hereby empowered to raise two thousand dollars, to cover the necessary expenses of investigating the case in America and England by issuing Scrip, which Scrip are to be the first lien upon the property when recovered.

Art. 4. Every ‘Scrip shall be sold for five dollars. entitling the holder to one hundred dollars out of the first money recovered from said Estate by any member of the Association, and no more scrip shall be sold by said agent than shall be necessary to raise said sum of two thousand dollars and the sum of ten percent shall be deducted by the said agent to remunerate him for selling.

Art. 5. The said Smith and Fisher are to receive the sum of two thousand dollars, (after deducting the ten per cent, from the sale of said Scrip,) and in addition thereto, we agree to pay them ten percent, of all the money or property which they may find due said family, that we, or any of us, or our heirs, executors, administrators or assigns shall ever recover from said property.

Art. 6. We further agree that the said White shall receive ten percent, of all the money or property which may be found due said family that we, or any of us, or our heirs, executors, administrators, or assigns, shall ever recover from said Estate.

Art. 7. No member of this Association shall be liable to pay more than one dollar, as expenses, or compensation, or otherwise, to any person or persons whatever.

Art 8. Any member of the Follansbee Family may become a member of this

Association by paying to C. G. White, agent as aforesaid, and by signing this Constitution, and each member shall be entitled to a printed report of all information gained in the case.

All members of the Follansbee family in America are invited to become members of this Association, and requested to forward their pedigree(so far as they know them) to Columbus Smith, West Salisbury, Vt., or to C. G. White, of :Middlebury, Vt. The following named persons are members of the Follansbee Association, as well as some others who have signed the Constitutions not yet returned.

[Here I have omitted the names listed for brevity]

REPORT

TO THE FOLLANSBBE ASSOCIATION:

           According to the wishes of the Association, I will here give you all the information I have been able to collect from different members of the Follansbee family, and from other sources in America. This report must necessary be very imperfect, not yet having been able to collect much information relative to the case, nor the pedigree of but few branches of this somewhat numerous family. Most members of this family are aware that from the early part of this century, it has been talked of, by members of the Follansbee family, that there was a large property in England which had been left for them, by a Follansbee in England. Mr. Waldo, of Randolph, VT, says: That, as early as 1810, there was great excitement there about the large property coming to Moses Follansbee and his heirs, from England. Wm. P. Wills, of E. Randolph, VT., says: I recollect, about 1807 or 1808, there was great excitement with the people in consequence of information that came from England, to Moses Follansbee, that there was a large property in England that belonged to the Follansbee’s in America; that some of the heirs were offered $1,000 at that time for their claim. Many others, in Randolph and vicinity, recollect the same thing.

 Seth P. Follansbee, of Enfield, says: I distinctly recollect, when a mere boy, of hearing my father, (Joseph Follansbee), tell my mother, that his father, Joseph Follansbee, had received a letter from England, saying there was a large property in England belonging to him and his connection. This was in the year 1809 or 1810.

 I am informed that, as early as 1810, the Follansbee’s sent a Mr. Seabury, from Canaan. N.H., to England, to look after the property that, a short time previous to that, an advertisement appeared in the American papers, calling for the Fallansbees in America, to claim a property in England. I have not been able to get a copy of this advertisement, nor have I been able to learn what was done in England by Mr. Seabury, or whether he ever reported to the claimants.

Next post I will continue with the Report which then begins to be a copy of letters on the investigation into the family tree and the estate in England.

-Joshua Follansbee

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Follongsby a place of baptism? 

The Vasculum: The North County Journal of Science and History. Vol. 10 No. 1. Pg. 29. Published 1923. 

Toponymic place-names are so frequent locally that it is not surprising to find a great many imitations, accidental and simulatory. Wherever there is an unaccented medial syllable the process of assimilation is likely to, came into play, almost inevitably where the syllable in question contains an “n”* An excellent example is HalIington, formerly Halidene. A remarkable instance is Follingsby which in 1140 was written Foletesbi-representing most probably Fulwihtes-bige, a place of baptism. 

     I am unsure of the validity of assuming Follingsby as representing Fulwihts-bige. Having seen the supposingly original charter from the Bishop of Duham to Thorald which was hundreds of acres of marsh land, Follongsby mentioned as a villiage and later 3 farms that were eventually sold off, to my mind it is unlikley it was named as a place of baptism. 

    This is just my personal opinion. There is no actual reason Thorald could not have named it as such. This would be easy to accept and call off the search for the origins of the name Follongsby. But, the location of Follongsby, the type of land, and its habitation status just build a different reasoning. It seems more likley that Thorald was building a source for finances and goods as a land owner or lord. 

    It is interesting that there a various reasonings for the name among as many histories. This tells me there (so far) is not a recorded meaning and reasoning behind the name. Rather, we are left to figure is out based on other evidences.  
-Josh Follansbee

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Henry Follansbie and Folansbye Villiage, The first link connecting the Place-Name Follansbee.

From: An hisorical, topographical, and descriptive view of the county Palatine of Durham…Vol. 1pg 17.   By Eneas Mackenzie, Marvin Ross

“Follonsry is bounded by Wreken Dyke on the north on the south and east by the parish of Washington and on the east by Boldon Thorald of London the grantee of Bishop William gave his vill of Folettibi to his younger son Nicholas who released his right in it to Robert Fitz Roger for twenty marks a gown and a palfrey The estate was held by John de Farneacres in the fourteenth century and afterwards by the Gategangs of Gateshead In 1429 Roger Thornton the wealthy merchant of Newcastle died seized of it but Lord Lumley who married the heiress of Thornton probably alienated the manor for it was soon after the property of the Hiltons in which family it continued until 1750 In consists of three farms North Follonsby South Follonsby and the Learn comprizing altogether 702 acres The first portion is the property of Thomas Wade Esq the second of Matthew Russell Esq and the Learn of the Barras family which family it continued until 1750 In consists of three farms North Follonsby South Follonsby and the Learn comprizing altogether 702 acres The first portion is the property of Thomas Wade Esq the second of Matthew Russell Esq and the Learn of the Barras family”

Reviewing some old material for my memory sake.

It is established that the area where the old vill. of Follonsby sat was an area of waste land granted to Thorald de London by Bishop William around 1154 to 1160 (12th C). Thorald then granted the Vill. to his son Nicolas who in turn released it to Robert Fitz Roger. There seems to be a gap, and then we know that in the 14th C. it was owned by John de Farnacres, etc etc until we see all the land sold off. No where from the beginning with Thorald to the eventual dissipation of the Follonsby area do we find in any record of an actual Follonsby owning, living, or working there. The earliest traceable Follansbie is perhaps Henry b. 1597 about 400 years after Thorald was granted the area. It just seems most likely that Henry or perhaps an earlier ancestor was from the area and his last name is a place name, it came from the area he lived, making the village or later Follonsby farms predating the surname of Follonsby (Follansbie, Follansbee, Follansby, Folletebi).

It is established that the original name was Folletebi. In The Place Names of Northumberland and Durham we read:

FOLLINGSBY 

Follingsby (Jarrow). c. 1140 F.P.D. Folete{s)hi, c, 
1180 Foleteby, Folescehy, c. 1220 Folasceby ; 1335 Ch. 
Folethehi ; 1343 J. and W. Folescehy ; 1400.45 Folancehy ; 
1446D.S.T. Folauncehey ; 1539 F.P.D. Folansbye, Folaunceby ; 
1580 Halm. Follenshye. 

Cf. FuUetby, Lines., D.B. Folesbi, Fullohi, Lines. Surv. 
Fuledebi, Fuletebi. The first element is a name of the same 
type as O.N. Haf-, Sumar-, Vetr-li^i=sea.-, summer- and 
winter-traveller. No name FuU-li6i is recorded, but there 
may have been such a name from the adj. full li'Sa, " well- 
provided with troops," " fuUy able " (Vigfusson and 
Fritzner). Cf. Selaby infra. Foletes and Folesce are 
anglicised genitives of this name. For n, v. Phonology, 
§ 55. Later a pseudo-patronymic form was developed.

It is interesting to read that the spelling Folansbye is found around 1539, and our earliest recorded ancestor Henry Follansbie was born in 1597. Noted is the spelling Follenshye in 1580, so I am forced to conclude without other evidence that Henry was possible born with the surname Follansbie and possibly his father or grandfather was the first to use the place-name as their last name, or being only 41 years between the two spellings, Henry could be the first to use the place-name assuming that both names were used as is common all over the world.

The answers lie with tracing Henry, which has been fruitless using just the internet.

-Josh Follansbee

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Follonsby Villiage, The Beginning?

Let’s see if I can untangle some of the history of Follingsby, or at least present it clearly enough for the reader to untangle.

Follingsby and Follonsby are two spellings of the same area. Follonsby predates Follinsby which is still used in England today.

Our text is Feodarium Prioratus Dunelmensis; A survey of the Estates of The Prior and Convent of Durham compiles in the Fifteenth Century. Published for the Surtees Society by Andres and Co. Durham, 1872. This is a published collection of a survey of estates during 1233-1244 A.D. The portions from the book are capitalized and my comments are in lower case.

FOLAUNCEBY.

FOLLONSBY, CLOSE TO HEWORTH, AND ALSO IN THE PARISH OF JARROW, IS NOT MENTIONED BY SYMEON. IT LIES TO THE SOUTH OF THE WREKENDYKE, WHICH ANCIENT ROAD PROBABLY BOUNDED THE ENCLOSED AND CULTIVATED LANDS AT THE TIME OF BISHOP WALCHER’S GIFT.

Symeon (Simeon) was a Monk and Historian of Durham Priory, his birth was around 1060 and he died after 1129. He was a contemporary of Bishop William Walcher (Bishop from 1071 to 1080) the first pre-reformation/post-conquest Bishop and of William de St-Calais (Bishop from 1081 to 1096) the second Bishop of that era. Wekendyke road was an ancient road with Pre-Roman and Roman history that ran through the south east part of an area called The Felling (which encompasses Follingsby.) Here, I have borrowed a map from http://www.gateshead-history.com/early-history-of-the-felling.html

_wsb_700x607_P1110988

AT SOME LATER TIME, AND NOT UNLIKELY WHEN THOROLD OBTAINED HIS GRANT, FOLLONSBY APPEARS TO HAVE BEEN CARVED OUT OF THE MOOR, THE MARSH LAND BETWEEN THE PRIOR AND CONVENT’S POSSESSIONS ON THE NORTH OF THE WREKENDYKE, AND THE LAND OF THE BISHOP FURTHER TO THE SOUTH.

So, our author commenting on the recorded estates here thinks that since Symeon did not mention Follonsby, it was created after Symeon and probably when Thorad de London received his grant from Bishop William of St. Barbara who was the sixth Bishop serving from 1143 to 1153. This is a nice observation that ties into a previous post https://follansbeehistory.wordpress.com/2015/05/14/where-is-follingsby/ where I wondered if the wording “perambulated and drawn up” meant created or verified. If we were to agree with the author here it would mean created and we would have the beginning of the Follonsby Village. However, we still do not have a tie from the Village to the name Follansbee outside of our ancestors being in the Durham area during the time the village was there.

Below I left the Latin intact for the purists who want to play with it on Google translate. You can skip down the page to 2. IT WILL BE REMEMBERED to pick up our story.

THE DIFFICULTY CREATED BY THE GRANTS OF BISHOPS GALFRID AND HUGH OF AN ESTATE, WHICH BELONGED TO THE PRIOR AND CONVENT, IS THUS REMOVED, FOR, IF THE SUPPOSITION STATED ABOVE IS CORRECT, THESE GRANTS REFER TO THE BOUNDARIES OF A NEW PIECE OF ENCLOSED LAND, WHICH BORDERED UPON THE MANORS OF THE BISHOP. THE FACT THAT THE CHARTERS, OF BOTH THE BISHOPS, PARTICULARIZE THE BOUNDARIES BETWEEN FOLLONSBY AND THE ADJACENT VILLS, IS IN FAVOUR OF THIS VIEW. THE TIME WHEN THE NEW VILL OF FOLLONSBY WAS CREATED MUST HAVE BEEN BETWEEN THE DATE OF THE FORGED CHARTER OF BISHOP WILLIAM THE FIRST, AND THE 5 JOHN, IN WHOSE CONFIRMATORY CHARTER OF THAT DATE THE PLACE OCCURS. AN INQUISITION WAS HELD 6 HENR. V., 13 BP. THOMAS, OF THE MANOR OF FOLLONSBY, ALIENATED BY SIR WILLIAM HYLTON, KNT. TO SIR PETER TYLIOL, KNT., WITHOUT THE BISHOP’S LICENSE, WHEN JOHN DE NEWTON, ROGER DE THORNTON AND THOMAS PITTINGTON, CHAPLAIN, THE TENANTS OF THE MANOR, SAID THAT IT WAS HELD OF THE PRIOR AND CONVENT IN SOCAGE.

THE COURT DECREED “QUOD PRŒDICTUM MANERIUM DE FOLANCEBY CUM PERTINENCIIS TENE- TUR DE PRIORE DUNELM. IMMEDIATE, ET NON DE DICTO DOMINO EPISCOPO IN CAPITE.” CART, QUART., FO. 57, A. THE FOLLOWING ENTRY OCCURS IN THE REPERTORIUM MAGNUM FO. 62, A, MEM. QUOD ROGERUS THORNTON HABET DUAS DIMISSIONES DE FOLAUNCEBY, TEM PORE WILLELMI PRIORIS PRIMI, QUARUM SIGILLATUR CERA VIRIDI HABET ISTA VERBA PRO HOMAGIO ET SERVICIO «»О CIRCA PRIN- CIPIUM, ET ALTERA IN CERA ALBA SINE PRŒDICTIS, ET ISTAS DUAS CARTAS DICTUS ROGERUS OSTENDIT DOMINO JOHAMII WESSYNTOU PRIORI, ANNO DNI. M.CCCC. XVJ ET XVIJ. GALFRIDUS DEI GRATIA DUNELMENSIS EPISCOPUS OMNIBUS BARONIBUS ET HO- MINIBUS EPISCOPATUS SUI, FRANCIS ET A NGLICIS, SAL U T EM. SCIATIS ME DEDISSE, ET CONCESSISSE ET BAC PRŒSENTI CARTA CONFIRMASSE THORALDO DE LUNDONIIS ET HEREDIBUS SUIS TOTAM TERRAM DE FOLETESBI, CUM OMNIBUS PERTINENCIIS, SECUNDUM DIVISAS SUAS, SICUT OSBER- TUS VICECOMES ET GALFRIDUS DE ESCOL- LAND ET WILLELMUS DE FREIBOIS ET ODO DE BRENBA ET ROGERUS DE PUTOT ET YECHARDUS ET DOLFINUS FRATER S «US EIS PERAMBULAVERUNT ET PRODUXERUNT, SCILICET, DE CAPITE FONTIS DE BOLEBURN USQUE SUBURNE, ET DE SUBURNE USQUE NORTBURNE, ET DE NORTBURNE USQUE HAROPE VERSUS ORIENTEM SECUNDUM CURSUSAQUŒ.ETDE HAROPE USQUE HARE- CARRE VERSUS AQUILONEM USQUE DIVISAS DE HETTHEWRDE, ET DE HETTHEWRDE AD BLACHELAWE, ET DE BLACHELAWE AD VRAKENDIC .ET AD FONTEM DE BOLE- BURNE. TENENDAM DE NOBIS ET SUCCES- SORIBUS NOSTRIS LIBERE, QUIETE, SOLUTE ET INTEGRE AB OMNI SERVICIO ET CONSUETU- DINE ET EXACTIONE. REDDENDO PER ANNUM 10S. PRO OMNIBUS REBUS. HIIS TESTIBUS, OSBERTO VICECOMITE, ODO DE BRENBA, ROBERTO DE MUNDE- UILLA, G. DE BONEUILLA, RADULFO FILIO WILLELMI, ROBERTO DEL TORP, ROBERTO DE COI’NERS, HUGONE BOREL, ROBERTO DE PUTOT, ROGERO DEL UEL, ROGERO DE SANCTA BARBA, DOLFINO, ROBERTO FREIBOIS, ENGELARIO ET MULTIS ALIIS. 4′” L™” PO»T ( IG. THOROLD GRANTED THE VILL TO HIS SON NICHOLAS, AS APPEARS BY A CHARTER WHICH IS GIVEN HERE. SCIANT OMNES, TAM LONGINQUI QUAM PROPINQUI, TAM FUTURI QUAM PRSE SENTES, QUOD EGO THORALDUS DE LUN- DON’, ASSENSU ET CONSENSU DOMINI HUGONIS DUNELM. EPISCOPI.ET ASSENSU DOMINI BERTRAMI PRIORIS ET CONVEN- TUS DUNELM. , CONCESSI ET DEDI ET HAC MEA PRŒSENTI CARTA MEA CONFIRMAVI NICHOLAO FILIO MEO ET HEREDIBUS SUIS VILLAM DE FOLETTEBI, CUM OMNIBUS PERTINENCIIS SUIS INFRA VILLAM ET EXTRA, ET CUM EISDEM DIVISIS ET EISDEM LIBERTATIBUS EAM ADQUISIVI TEMPORE WILLELMI DUNELM. EPISCOPI, ET CUM CATALLIS, ET CUM ADJUTORIO LAY SING DE CLIFDONA ET JOHANNIS FILII SUI, SCILICET, IN BOSCHO ET MORA, ET IN PRATIS ET PASTURIS, ET IN MOLENDINIS ET AQUIS, ET IN OMNIBUS ALIIS EXITIBUS. ET IDEM NICHOLAUS ADQUIETABIT DEBITA MEA VERSUS PRIOREM ET CONVENTUM, ET VERSUS DOMINUM HUGONEM EPISCO- PUM X MARCAS, ET APUD NOVUM CAS- TELLUM ET GATESHEUED XXV MARCAS, NIGELLO DE NEUTON IJ MARCAS ; ET MICHI QUAMDIU VIXERO MEA NECES- SARIA MINISTRABIT, UTRUM VOLUERO APUD FOLLETTEBI AN APUD VILLAM DE GATES HEUED, ET OMNIA DEBITA MEA ADQUIE TABIT. HII SUNT TESTES, BERTRAMUS PRIOR DUNELM., PHILIPPUS VICECOMES, SIMON CAMERARIUS, JORDANUS ESCOU- LANT, ALEXANDER DE HILTON, ROGE RUS DE AUDRI, SIMON DE HAUTHORN, GAL FRID US FILIUS RICARDI, THOMAS DE MUNDAUILL, WALTERUS DE WEISSIGTON, WILLELMUS DE HOSWRTH, PATRICIUS DE OSWRTH ET MULTI ALII. 2″‘” 4P SPEC.,

  1. IT WILL BE REMEMBERED THAT THOROLD OF LONDON BOUGHT PIPEWELLGATE FROM THE BISHOP, AND IT IS PROBABLE THAT HE ALSO BOUGHT FOLLONSBY OF THE PRIOR AND CONVENT. FROM THE PRECEDING CHARTER IT SEEMS THAT HE HAD NOT PAID FOR EITHER ESTATE, AT ALL EVENTS IN FULL, AND, WHEN THEY PASSED INTO THE HANDS OF HIS SON NICHOLAUS, HE TOOK UPON HIMSELF HIS FATHER’S DEBTS TO BOTH THE BISHOP AND CONVENT.

Of interest here, is that Nicolas is the first to be called de Folletebi or Nicholaus of Follonsby. You can catch it if you keep reading.

NO GRANT OF PIPEWELL GATE TO NICHOLAS EXISTS, BUT FROM THE WORDING OF THE CHARTER UNDER CONSIDERATION, THAT THOROLD WAS TO LIVE EITHER AT GATESHEAD OR FOLLONSBY, AS HE INCLINED, IT APPEARS LIKELY THAT HIS GATESHEAD PROPERTY HAD EQUALLY WITH THAT AT FOLLONSBY BEEN ACQUIRED BY NICHOLAS. THE VILL WAS ALSO GRANTED TO THE SAME NICHOLAS BY HIS BROTHER “HELIAS FILIUS TORALDI DE NOVO CASTELLO SUPER TYNAM, CONCESSU BERTRAND PRIONS ET CONVENTUS ECCLESIŒ,” WHO ON HIS SEAL CALLS HIMSELF HELIAS CLERICUS. HE DESCRIBES IT AS HITHERTO HELD BY NICHOLAS “DE DEO ET SANCTO CUTH- BERTO, FACIENDO ILLUD SERVICIUM PRIORI ET CONVENTUI DUNELMENSI QUOD TORAL- DUS PATER SUI ET MEI FECIT IN DIEBUS SUIS.” THE CHURCH OF DURHAM WAS, THEREFORE, IN SPITE OF THE GRANT BY BISHOP GALFRID, IN THE POSITION OF SUPERIOR LORD, AND THOROLD AND HIS FAMILY HELD UNDER THEM. THE FOLLOWING CHARTER FITLY FINDS A PLACE HERE. NICHOLAUS DE FOLETTEBI … DE CON- CESSIONE ET VOLUNTATE CRISTIANŒ UXORIS MEŒ ET HEREDUM MEORUM, . . . DEO ET DOMUI ELEMOSINARIŒ SANCTI CUTHBERTI IN DUNELM. . . . XL ACRAS TERRŒ WAIG- NABILCS, IN CAMPO DE FOLETTEBI . . . ET TOTAM MEDIETATEM MARISCI QUSE EST INTER PRSEDICTAM TERRAM VERSUS SUST- RUM, SCILICET, QUANTUM LATITUDE J ACГŒ ET DIMIDIŒ EXTENDITUR, ET ILLUD TOF- TUM ET CROFTUM QUI FUERUNT MELDR’ IN VILLA DE FOLETTEBI . . . HIIS TESTI- BUS, ROGERO DE KIBLESWRTH, WILLELMO DE OSUURTHA, WILLELMO DE KETTUN, WALTERO DE FERIE, ROGERO DE FERIA, WALTERO DE WESSINGTONE, WILLELMO DE MUNKETONE, WALTERO DE HEWRDA, WILLELMO DE FULLWELLE, SIGAR’ DE HETHEUURD’, JOHANNE DE GARUE, ODARD LNN ET ALIIS. LIBER ELEMOS., FO. 27.

Below we read of how the village changed hands from Ol’ Nick to Robert Fitz Roger and from Robert to the Durham Convent.

NICHOLAS DE FOLETTEBI AND HELIAS HIS BROTHER AFTERWARDS QUITCLAIMED THE VILL TO ROBERT FITZ ROGER, WHO GAVE IT TO THE CONVENT OF DURHAM BY THE FOLLOWING CHARTER, WHICH SEEMS TO HAVE BEEN UNKNOWN TO SURTEES. ROBERTUS FILIUS ROGERI . . . DEO ET SANCTO CUDBERTO DE DUNOLMIA ET PRIORI ET MONACHIS IBIDEM DEO SERVIENTIBUS, IN PURAM ET PERPETUAM ELEMOSINAM, TOTAM TERRAM DE FOLE- TEBY, QUAM EMI PRO PECUNIA MEA DE HELIA FILIO TOROLDI DE LONDON’ ET NICHOLAO F RATRE SUO, ET QUIETAM CLAMA- VERUNT IN CURIA DUNOLMIŒ DE SE ET HEREDIBUS SUIS. TENENDAM . . . CUM MOLENDINO ET CUM OMNIBUS PERTINEN- CIIS SUIS . . . HIIS TESTIBUS, WILLEL MO FILIO ROCELINI, COLINO DE DAM-NENILL, HENRICO DE NEUILL, ROBERTO FILIO MALDREDI, GILEBERTO HANSARD FRATRE SUO, WILLELMO DE LUNGUILERS, WILLELMO DE G’OISNERES, EOBERTO DE MUNDEUILL, HUGONE DE MOREWIK, WIL LELMO DE BLUNUILL, HENRICO DE FER- LINGTON, ROGERO GULAFRE, WALTERO DE WESSINTON, JOHANNE DE ARGENTEM, JOBANNE DE WENLAUETON CLERICO ET MULTIS ALIIS. V” 4″* SPEC., 8.

BISHOP HUGO DE PUSAT, BY A GRANT MADE EARLY IN HIS EPISCOPATE, PRINTED P. 10, »., GIVES THE VILL TO THE CONVENT. FROM THE TERMS OF THIS CHARTER, WHICH CONTAINS THE BOUNDARIES BE TWEEN FOLLONSBY AND THE BISHOP’S MANOR OF BOLDON, THERE CAN BE LITTLE DOUBT THAT NO PRIMARY GRANT WAS MADE BY THIS INSTRUMENT, BUT THAT IT WAS GIVEN, IN CONSEQUENCE OF THE ERECTION OF THE NEW VILL OUT OF THE MARCH BETWEEN THE BISHOP AND THE PRIOR AND CONVENT, TO THE LATTER AS THE SUPREME LORDS OF THE VILL, FOR THE BENEFIT OF THEIR SUB-FEUDATORY. ABOUT THE END OF THE 12TH CENTURY THE PRIOR AND CONVENT GRANTED TWO PARCELS OF LAND OUT OF THEIR WASTE AT THE LEAM. THE CHARTERS IN CONNEC TION WITH THIS ARE GIVEN BELOW. THE DISTRICT CALLED THE LEAM IS PARTLY IN UPPER HEWORTH AND PARTLY IN FOLLONSBY. BARTRAMUS PRIOR ET CONVENTUS DUNELM. ECCLESIŒ . . . JOHANNI DE CUPUM, PRO HOMAGIO ET SERVITIO SUO, XXX ACRAS TERRŒ IN VASTO NOSTRO DE LEM, TENENDAS ET HABENDAS SIBI ET HEREDIBUS SUIS DE NOBIS IN FEOUDO ET HEREDITATE . . . REDDENDO INDE NOBIS ANNUATIM 10S. … ET FACIENT NOBIS COMMUNE AUXILIUM QUANDOCUMQUE IPSUM AUXILIUM PER TOTAM TERRAM NOSTRAM PONEMUS, ET SEQUENTUR MOLENDINUM NOSTRUM. HIIS TESTI- BUS, MAGISTRO WALTERO DE HADINTONE, MAGISTRO ALANO DE RICHEMUNDE, WILLELMO DE MONEKETONE, NICOLAO DE FOLETEBY, WALTERO DE HEWUR’, HELYA, SIMONE ET SIG’ DE HETHEWURD, ADAM DE AWIC, JOHANNE DE KETTONE, RICARDO BRUN, ET THOMA DE CAMERA ET MULTIS ALIIS. CART. QUART., IO. 288, A. BERTRAMUS PRIOR ET CONVENTUS DUNELMENSIS ECCLESIŒ . . . JOHANNI DE HEBERME, PRO HOMAGIO ET SERVITIO SUO, XXX ACRAS TERRŒ IN VASTO NOSTRO DE LEM, TENENDAS ET HABENDAS SIBI ET HEREDIBUS SUIS DE NOBIS IN FEOUDO ET HEREDITATE . . . LIBERE . . . EXCEPTO QUOD NOBIS INDE REDDENT ANNUATIM 7S. 6D. … ET FACIENT NOBIS COM MUNE AUXILIUM QUANDOCUMQUE IPSUM AUXILIUM PER TOTAM TERRAM NOSTRAM PONEMUS, ET SEQUENTUR MOLENDINUM NOSTRUM. [THE SAME WITNESSES AS IN THE PRECEDING CHARTER, BUT HAVING IN ADDITION GIBBE.] IT IS INDORSED: HOC SCRIPTUM REDDIDIT NOBIS ROBERTUS GRAY DE HEBERN ANNO DNI. 1 504, PRO MUNERE DATO SIBI. I”” 4′” SPEC., 105.

There we have it. The scant evidence and educated opinion that Follonsby was a newly created villiage when it was purchased by Thorad de London. Why did he name it Folettebi? Previously I dug into the name Folet and the mix of Scandinavian, French and German parts of Follingsby giving us the meaning Village of Folet. There is another possible that I will dig into next time. There is no recorded name Folet, but the word has a meaning of full, could Fulletebi be a villiage full of trees in an area that has been felled of them? Till next time..

-Josh Follansbee

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